Rudi Lapper: “‘Carving’ as an edged direction change was also placed in the right sequence.”

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Rudi Lapper, Mogasi
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Rudi Lapper, the director of the Staatliche Ski Instructor Certification, answered some of our questions about skiing, carving and the new ski lesson plan he designed. He also explains what a good instructor does and whether an instructor is worthwhile for every guest.

Mogasi: You created the new lesson plan. What changes were essential for this?

Rudi Lapper: We wanted to deliver a more practice-orientated progression in the new lesson plan. There is a clear structure and simple content, especially the practical methodologies, featured in this plan. “Carving” as an edged direction change was also placed in the right sequence.

If you observe skiers in a resort, you will see that there are not many who can perform this kind of direction change.

Mogasi: The term “carving”, which is mastered by advanced level skiers, means “edged skiing”. What percent of skiers reach such a level?

Rudi Lapper: I cannot give an exact percent but if you observe skiers in a resort, you will see that there are not many who can perform this kind of direction change.

Mogasi: Carving originated in snowboarding. The notoriety of the snowboard Staatliche certification cannot keep up with that of the skiers, why is that?

Rudi Lapper: I think this is dictated by the market. Comparatively, the snowboard certification is only offered every second year. The number of participants is also incomparable.

Mogasi: Would you recommend a ski lesson to every winter holiday-maker?

Rudi Lapper: Ski lessons are highly recommended. Not only to explore the resort, but also to provide the necessary safety on the mountain, which are just a few reasons why people should go to ski school.

It is also an art, how I treat my guests, how I motivate them and whether they remain faithful to skiing, the resort and the town.

Mogasi: A good ski instructor is a good skier. A good skier may not be a good instructor. What makes a good instructor?

Rudi Lapper: A really good instructor ecompasses the whole package. The guest requires the necessary know-how. It is also an art, how I treat my guest, how I motivate them an whether they remain faithful to skiing, the resort and the town. These are the qualities that make an instructor great.

Mogasi: Candidates are able to teach skiing upon successful completion of their Level 1 certification. Many look for work during holiday periods and want to go skiing. What are the basic requirements to become a Level 1 instructor? 

Rudi Lapper: The basic requirement for a Level 1 instructor is to be able to ski safely on a variety of different slopes. After a ten-day training, which is divided into practical and theoretical parts, successful candidates are allowed to teach.

I am of the opinion that a lot must be developed and re-established, in particular in ski racing, which is in my opinion no longer up-to-date in some areas.

Mogasi: What trends are emerging? What direction is skiing developing in? 

Rudi Lapper: As in the ski industry, division has begun within the sport of skiing. In ski resorts, parks have been built and freeriding has established itself. The number of skiers is not necessarily increasing. Where skiing will develop is not easy to predict. I am of the opinion that a lot must be developed and re-established, in particular in ski racing, which is in my opinion no longer up-to-date in some areas.

Mogasi: Should the Winter Olympic Games be held in Innsbruck-Tirol in 2026? 

Rudi Lapper: I haven’t really given it too much thought. First and foremost, it depends on public opinion. For Sportland Tirol it would certainly be a great challenge and presentation for our country. Whether the public want to have it, we will see on 15.10.


Rudi Lapper 48, long-time exam director of the Tirolean Ski Instructing Federation, training director of the Staatliche Ski Instructor Certification, ski technician, author of the new ski lesson plan. Owner of Skischule Kirchberg.

5 COMMENTS

      • I agree, side cut is way old, but proper formula to calculate and theory behind it was developed in late 80’s as explained in cited article. And only after that and after years of intensive pressure (and some luck) the carving turn took of in mainstream skiing. You have no idea how many years of ignoring, opposing and making fun on my account passed between first pair and the moment when 12 years old boy beat word cup racer in slalom by 2 s in single run, before ‘experts’ took carving seriously. To say it was just copy of SB is huge oversimplification. For the theory, you can read

        • I can see you put a lot of passion in this topic and this is the spirit we adore and so many people in the industry have. And of course it is not a copy, since the building of skis and snowboards evolved parallel, but for the modern carving turn the race boarders in the late 80ies and 90ies were the role model on a big scale.
          We’d like to invite you to publish an article about the origins of carving here on Mogasi 😉

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